Correction: California Tornado-Q&A storyJanuary 13, 2017 2:20am

LOS ANGELES (AP) — In a story Jan. 11 about a tornado in Northern California, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the tornado was south of Sacramento. It was actually north of Sacramento.

A corrected version of the story is below:

A tornado in California? Not as rare as you might think

The latest storm to wallop Northern California whipped up a small tornado that downed trees and fences near Sacramento

By CHRISTOPHER WEBER

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The latest storm to wallop Northern California whipped up a small tornado that downed trees and fences near Sacramento.

Here's what you need to know about twisters in California, which occur regularly but in limited numbers and force.

___

HOW BIG WAS TUESDAY'S TORNADO?

The twister that touched down north of the state capital registered EF0, at the lowest edge of the tornado scale that goes up to EF5. The Enhanced Fujita (EF) scale measures the intensity of tornadoes in the U.S. and Canada based on damage caused.

No injuries were reported from the tornado, which was on the ground for 3/8 of a mile and carved a path of minor damage about 100 yards wide, according to National Weather Service meteorologist David Rowe.

"It came as a little bit of a surprise considering that we're so focused on all the heavy snow and rain," Rowe said.

Most California twisters are in the EF0-EF1 range and are less damaging and deadly than their Midwest counterparts. The strongest ever recorded in California were EF3s — one in Riverside County in Aug. 1973 and another in Orange County in Feb. 1978

___

HOW COMMON ARE TORNADOES IN CALIFORNIA?

Of the 1,000-or-so tornadoes that annually strike the United States, about 11 occur in California, according to the American Meteorological Society.

Thirteen roared through in 2005, more than Oklahoma that year.

In October 2012, five tornadoes touched down in north central California, damaging dozens of homes and a handful of commercial buildings.

That event marked the highest number of tornadoes in one day for California since April Fool's Day in 1996, when five tornadoes flattened trees and barns near the north central city of Stockton.

California tornadoes are most common in wide open spaces in the state's Central Valley, the agricultural heartland where the terrain is similar to that of the Great Plains.

___

WHAT CAUSES TORNADOES?

Tuesday's twister accompanied a powerful line of thunderstorms and followed days of volatile weather, said National Weather Service meteorologist Travis Wilson.

They were ideal conditions for creating twisters. When cooler air is forced aloft, wind speeds tend to increase and that can cause tornadoes, Wilson said.

Page 1 of 1

More Stories Like This

Traffic moves past an icing warning sign at night on I-70 west Lawrence, Kan., Saturday, Jan. 14, 2017. Parts of the central U.S. grappled Saturday with a second day of road-glazing ice and braced for more of the treacherous, below-freezing weather expected to close out the holiday weekend. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)
Central US Ice storm falls short of dire forecasts
Poodle reunited with owners after crash in eastern MontanaA toy poodle who ran away after a car crash in eastern Montana has been reunited with its owners after managing to survive in severe winter weather for over a week
Today in History - Monday, January 16 2017
California Supreme Court Justice Goodwin Liu poses for photographs in his office in San Francisco, Friday, Jan. 13, 2017. A new study co-authored by Liu, a prominent Asian American judge, finds Asian Americans are well-represented among the nation's attorneys, but still missing from leadership positions in the legal profession. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
Few Asian-Americans hold top legal jobs, new study says
Official: Kids hurt in deadly Baltimore house fire improvingA Baltimore fire official says two young children who escaped a massive house fire last week that killed six of their siblings are improving
Officials: Unfilled border tunnels in Mexico a security riskU.S. officials say Mexico's inability to fully seal up border tunnels dug by drug smugglers poses a security risk and is an open invitation for cartels to carve out new tunnels
AdChoices

Related Searches

Related Searches

AdChoices