{{HREF}}

Trump targets Canada, reimposing tariffs on…

President Donald Trump says that the United States is reinstating a 10% import tax on Canadian aluminum

The Best Fruit For Health

A list of several fruits that have the best health benefits.

Fed's Main Street pandemic support program off to…

The Federal Reserve says its Main Street Lending Program designed to help small and medium-sized companies get through the pandemic has managed to make just eight loans in its first month of operations

End of The Convention As We Know It?

Especially in the days of television, some of the biggest events in the political calendar have been the prime time Democratic and Republican political conventions. But, this year, the structure of the extravaganzas have changed significantly due to Coronavirus concerns. Experts say, this may not be all bad, in fact, of all events facing a shake up because of the pandemic, political conventions may be best suited for change. 0.22 Alex Vogel: CEO Vogel Group "In modern politics, conventions really had become well produced tv shows. bump to "You will not longer have those amazing shots of delegates swarming around the floor, I think they will be able to produce some of that digitally' Experts argue, in the modern climate, conventions were already less relevant than they had been in the past. Robert Shapiro, Columbia University, 0.40 "The conventions tend to be more publicity shows than substantive events." That's the impact it may have on the viewing public, but what of the parties? Lawrence Tabas, Chair PA GOP 0.50 "It would be nice to have a great convention like we had in Cleveland and the excitement from it, but we will be able to recreate that on many different levels. Jaime Harrison, US Senate Candidate South Carolina 0.57 " A lot of folks look forward to conventions every four years and I'm one of them, But you know, this year we just have to do it differently." And as for the rising stars of the party who normally come to prominence during a convention, it's likely they will still have their moment in the sun. Alex Vogel, CEO Vogel Group 1.17 "Both parties have used conventions, both to highlight their bench, and also to use that as an opportunity to have new voices get the message across and I think that would be no difference in this context at all. And some experts even venture to say, that the lack of delegates may make it easier to toe the party line. Vogel 1.34 In many ways, putting on a convention is a lot easier when you don't have thousands of delegates and the unpredictable nature of human behavior to deal with." While the big crowds, falling balloons, and patriotic music are going by the wayside, it's certain that both parties are working hard to put on a great show.

AdChoices Icon

California, cities battle over marijuana…

Where can you deliver legal marijuana in California

Muscle Memory and Working Out

Your brain and muscles communicate to allow you to take breaks when you workout.

Uber lost $1.8B in 2Q as riders stayed home and…

Uber lost $1.78 billion in the second quarter as the pandemic carved a gaping hole in its ride-hailing business, with millions of people staying home to reduce the spread of the coronavirus

Mindful Technology

More of us are working from home more than every. Here are some tips to make sure you are being healthy with all your screen time.

Workers want mandated temp checks for casino…

Atlantic City casino workers say five casinos are not physically checking the temperatures of guests entering the properties, and want New Jersey’s governor to require the casinos to do so to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus

Walmart is Making Some Big Changes

Walmart is receiving praise for its many big changes.

AdChoices Icon

Congress urges Postal Service to undo changes…

Lawmakers from both parties are calling on the U.S. Postal Service to immediately reverse operational changes that are causing delays in deliveries across the country just as big volume increases are expected for mail-in election voting

COVID-19: Vaccine Skeptics_Broadcast

As the medical community speeds towards the creation of a safe and effective vaccine, many Americans insist they would not feel safe taking one. A recent Associated Press poll revealed only 50% of Americans would agree to get one. We examine why such skepticism exists. Expert insight is offered by Dr. William Schaffner, Professor of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Dr. Kevin Schulman Professor of Medicine at the Clinical Excellence Research Center at Stanford and Dean Katherine Baicker, Emmett Dedmon Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy at Chicago University. Script:IN THE RACE FOR A CORONA VIRUS VACCINE, 2 US DRUG MAKERS ARE IN THE THIRD PHASE OF TESTING ... MEANING AN APPROVED VACCINE COULD BE A FEW SHORT MONTHS AWAY. Sot Dr. William Schaffner/ Professor of Preventive Medicine Vanderbilt University School of Medicine3:14 If everything goes as planned perhaps by the beginning of the next year by the beginning of 2021 we will have some information about how safe the vaccine is 3:24 HOWEVER, ACCORDING TO A RECENT POLITICO POLL NEARLY 60 PERCENT OF VOTERS SAY THE *TESTING* OF A VACCINE SHOULD BE THE PRIORITY... INCLUDING IF IT MEANS DELAYING THE ROLLOUT. AND EVEN IF A VACCINE IS AVAILABLE BY EARLY 2021, THE AMERICAN PUBLIC IS STILL SPLIT ON WHETHER OR NOT THEY WILL GET THE VACCINE...IN AN ASSOCIATED PRESS POLL ONLY 50 PERCENT SAID THEY WOULD. Sot Dr. Kevin Schulman Professor of Medicine, Clinical Excellence Research Center, Stanford6:46 I think the messaging to the American public has to be clear and consistent about the data what we know about the vaccine, how it has been tested, how that data has been evaluated, and we have to be transparent if we are going to build trust and get the adoption that we hope to have 7:06 AND IN A PEW POLL EARLIER THIS SPRING, NEARLY A THIRD OF YOUNG PEOPLE SAY THEY WOULDN'T GET A VACCINE... WHICH IS ESPECIALLY TROUBLING AS MILLENIALS ACCOUNT FOR INCREASING NUMBERS OF COVID CASES... Sot Katherine Baicker Emmett Dedmon Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy at Chicago University. 7:15 Once a vaccine is approved I hope that everyone takes it because we are all better off when the disease has nowhere to spread and individuals are better off when they are not susceptible to the disease 7:24ONE FEAR OF HEALTH OFFICIALS IS THAT THE ANTI VAXING COMMUNITY WILL USE THE GENERAL MISTRUST OF GOVERNMENT AND ITS HANDLING OF THE CORONAVIRUS AS A WAY TO SPREAD MISINFORMATION ... MEANING ANOTHER UPHILL BATTLE IN CONTAINING THE VIRUS.

4 poultry plant execs indicted after 2019…

Four executives from two Mississippi poultry processing plants have been indicted on federal charges tied to one of the largest workplace immigration raids in the U.S. in the past decade

COVID-19: Vaccine Skeptics

As the medical community speeds towards the creation of a safe and effective vaccine, many Americans insist they would not feel safe taking one. A recent Associated Press poll revealed only 50% of Americans would agree to get one. We examine why such skepticism exists. Expert insight is offered by Dr. William Schaffner, Professor of Preventive Medicine at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Dr. Kevin Schulman Professor of Medicine at the Clinical Excellence Research Center at Stanford and Dean Katherine Baicker, Emmett Dedmon Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy at Chicago University.

Apple shines in pandemic with $2 trillion value…

Early in 2020, Apple appeared to be caught in a horrible bind

The Benefits of Dark Chocolate

With the health benefits associated with chocolate, sometimes a snack can go a long way.

AdChoices Icon

US rescinds global 'do not travel' coronavirus…

The Trump administration has rescinded its warning to Americans against all international travel because of the coronavirus pandemic

Running Out of Aluminum

Many chose to stock up on beer before the pandemic, causing a shortage in aluminum.